share

Weaving Baskets: Waxed Irish Linen Thread

May 21, 2009

Pod1
Above: one of my twined baskets "Pod 2007" for which I used 7-ply waxed Irish Linen Thread. The basket is 12 x 8 inches wide. There are also small brown wooden beads in the in the twining. Basket ©2007 Roz Stendahl, photo ©2007 Tom Nelson.

Not everyone knows I make baskets. Today I was browsing in Wet Paint (I found a cool book I'll tell you about just as soon as I read it) and up walks a former student, Sue, and we have the best chat about what she's doing, and I get some tips on elder care strategies (though Dick's family isn't as big as Sue's so some of it won't translate but it is always great to hear how other people cope).

Sue told me she started making baskets while she was south for the winter and we started talking about twining (which is what I usually do—my baskets are all made from threads, fibers, wire, trash, and paper, but nothing like reeds because I'm allergic to all that stuff!). I told her I always found a great selection of color and plys at Royalwood, Ltd.

Then I got to thinking that if Sue didn't know about Royalwood, maybe other folks didn't either, so I just thought I would mention it. The great thing about having the thicker threads (7- and 12-ply) is that you can work up a bigger basket pretty quickly. So the next time you want to do some twining you'll know where you can find those thicker threads.

    • Meliors
    • May 21, 2009
    Reply

    What an amazing basket, like a sea anemone! I’d love to see more of your baskets…

    • Velma
    • May 21, 2009
    Reply

    I love this basket!!! I’d like a passel of pods, please!

    • Roz
    • May 21, 2009
    Reply

    Thanks Meliors, you can see some of my baskets on my website at https://rozwoundup.com/bead.html (I’ve got the baskets and the beaded baskets mixed in together. I’m rather behind in getting photos taken and posting, however.)

    I think it looks like a sea anemone too. Those fringy bits are a pain to dust though!

    • Roz
    • May 21, 2009
    Reply

    Velma, I would too! They are slowly being made.

    • Chris
    • May 21, 2009
    Reply

    So recommend a good book on Twining. I learned it in school, but need a refresher.

    • Roz
    • May 22, 2009
    Reply

    Chris, the problem I have with most weaving books is that they don’t focus on technique, but rather on projects, which I don’t do. I want to know how to start something, how to do a “stitch” so to speak, how to end off, but I figure I’ll do everything else on my own.

    There are tons of books on the market which tell you how to make 16 baskets or so and from that you can find the twining basket and learn the steps as that person does it. So for those books I’d say just look around the bookstore and see what appeals to you.

    But better is to go to the library and get the older books from the 1960s or so when weaving was taking on a sort or resurgence in the “art” world as opposed to a craft (but don’t get me started on that whole thing, art vs. craft, because without craft there is no art, blah, blah, blah.)

    I don’t have titles for any of those books, I just know I looked at bunches of them when I was in my 20s. A good way to take a break from literary research.

    My favorite more contemporary book on weaving is just what I wanted: technique pulled apart into pieces, not projects. That’s Flo Hoppe’s book “Contemporary Wicker Basketry.” The subtitle says there are projects (I think they have to do that for marketing) and there are projects at the end of the book, BUT the bulk of the book is about individual techniques. Want to learn to do chasing weave, turn to page 11, nice diagram, some instructions, OK, now you’re on your own, go do something with this.

    I love that! And so on through the different weaves. Borders, lids, attaching handles. All this stuff gets looked at in isolation so that you can see what is going on and not have to make a project to find it out.

    The book was published in 1996 by Lark. I got a used copy which was lovingly cared for and came in a plastic cover. ISBN 1-887374-15-9

    I don’t use wicker at all in my baskets because I’m allergic and really bothered when you wet the stuff to make it supple. But if you know how to do a “stitch” well then you can do that stitch with any material you want.

    How fun is that?!

    Let me know how your weaving adventure goes!

    • Velma
    • May 23, 2009
    Reply

    Those books from the sixties and seventies were wonderful! The modern stuff is largely glitzy and schmucky. One author I remember is Dona Z Meilach. Looking at the Jack Lenor Larsen books may also be helpful– and old issues of LaPlantz’s The News Basket are good, too.

    • Roz
    • May 23, 2009
    Reply

    Velma, you are a wealth of new names and info. I haven’t read books by the folks you mentioned (in weaving) and will seek them out.

    My exposure to LaPlantz is her two books on bookmaking. I knew she did other things before but I don’t know that I ever knew it was weaving! That’s pretty interesting.

    I will look out for her basket writings as well!

    Many thanks!

    • Sue Martin
    • May 26, 2009
    Reply

    Roz, thanks for posting your source for waxed linen – I had forgotten the name by the time I returned home. It was good running into you.
    Others, if you’re interested in twining and other techniques for jewelry, I like Mary Hettmansperger’s book, “Fabulous Woven Jewelry.” Sue

    • Roz
    • May 26, 2009
    Reply

    Sue, thank you for remembering to remind me of the woven jewelry book title! It was great to see you.

    • Nancy Jacobs
    • June 4, 2009
    Reply

    Ok, That is just cool. I’ve made one waxed linen basket/necklace. Great job!
    Nancy
    http://www.basketmasterweavings.blogspot.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

RozWoundUp
Close Cookmode

Pin It on Pinterest