Currently Browsing: papers for visual journaling 6 articles

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Don’t Get Attached

Above: Puffin sketches made at the zoo in an 8 x 8 inch handmade journal which contains defunct printmaking paper. Verso: first sketches of the day made with a dried out Staedtler Pigment Liner. But I am having so much fun. I think I might have started to giggle. The puffins were sitting right on […]

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Paper Samples and Swatches—and the Colors of Stonehenge Paper

Left: 6 x 6 inch page, sketch is about 5.5 x 4.5 inches, Stonehenge grey toned paper (don't know which grey for sure as you'll learn below in today's post) and gouache. A little bit of rubberstamp ink was used to complete the frame on the left side. (Orange watersoluble colored pencil sketch with Schmincke […]

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MCBA Visual Journal Collective September Meeting—Includes a Film!

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Above: Background painting over a spread in my current visual journal. I wanted a visual for today's post and I wanted to share this background with you. I've been prepainting backgrounds on spreads throughout my new journal, which uses Gutenberg for the text paper. If you click on the image to view an enlargement you'll see the slighty nubby texture of this laid paper. I love the way the layers of acrylic ink take to this paper. Read at the end of the post about this background. Then go make some background pages in your own journal and come and join us on Monday!

Monday, September 21, from 7 to 9 p.m. is the next meeting of the MCBA Visual Journal Collective.
This meeting is free and open to anyone who is interested in keeping visual journals, regardless of any skill level. (We meet the third Monday of each month, with no meetings in May and December.)

This month we will start our meeting with The 1000 Journals Documentary, by Andrea Kreuzhage. You can read about this interesting project here.

I'm sure this film will inspire and delight the Collective members and lead to a lively discussion. In addition, we will be sharing work from the recent Minnesota State Fair and exchanging books in the on-going Altered Book Journal Round Robin.

Join us to learn how other Twin Cities artists embrace a variety of methods and approaches in their visual journals.

Sketching Out—Narrowly Missing the Rain

Last night I took a moment after a meeting at MCBA to sketch the Metrodome. You can see the sketch at Urban Sketchers: Twin Cities. I'm fascinated with the way this Twin Cities' landmark changes in the weather conditions. Thanks to the influence of my friend Ken Avidor I am starting to pay more attention […]

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It Only Takes A Moment

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Left: 2-minute brush sketch of a bunny sitting at the far end of the yard. Schmincke gouache with a Niji waterbrush, on Velin Arches (formerly Arches Text Wove) paper, 6.5 x 8 inch (approx) journal. Click on the image to see an enlargement. (The text was written with a Staedtler Pigment Liner after the bunny hopped away.)

I've said it before, and I'll say it again, over and over, because it's good for me to hear it too. It only takes a moment to make a journal entry!

Yesterday after running errands I looked out the window and saw a bunny sitting happily in the dwindling sunlight. I wasn't sure how long it would stay there and it was too far away, and back lit, for me to get clear details, but I ran to get my gouache palette and Niji Waterbrush and just painted a quick impression in my journal, in less than 2 minutes. You always have time for that.

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A Trip to the Allergist’s

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Above: Journal spread sketched in the Allergist's office while I was waiting the obligatory 30 minutes after my allergy shots. Page size is approx. 6 x 8 inches; spread 12 x 8 inches. Click on the image for an enlargement.

Yesterday marked the end of a crazy week. I was looking forward to a relaxing time at the Allergist's sketching in the waiting room—but there weren't any people there. Finally a lovely young woman appeared, but she kept getting up and disappearing. (When you are in the injection waiting room you look through a small doorway into the main waiting room and your view is limited. People walk in and out of the "frame," so to speak. I ended up having to write more notes than I usually do on such a visit, to fill up my time.)

A couple notes about the spread:

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