Currently Browsing: Faber-Castell Albrecht Dürer Watercolor pencils 11 articles

6a01053560de5d970b0120a575a35b970b-450wi

My Last Sketches at the 2009 Minnesota State Fair

090904KSheep

Above: Quick sketch of a sheep using a Pentel Pocket Brush Pen. 9 x 7 inches, Fabriano Artistico 300 lb. hot press watercolor paper. That’s my admission ticket which I stuck on at home. Click on the image to view an enlargement.

As I pack my 2009 Minnesota State Fair journal cards away, to await the construction of a portfolio, I have two more cards I’d like to share with you—more on "the taking a break to revive yourself theme," which I mentioned earlier when showing my break and after cards from my two other Fair visits. (First day break, second day break.)

6a01053560de5d970b0120a5c0b366970c-450wi

Another Note on Taking a Mental Break to Get a Second Wind

090901KSheepInk

Above: sheep sketch; 9 x 7 inches, Fabriano Artistico 300 lb. Hot Press Watercolor paper; Pentel Pocket Brush Pen and Faber-Castell Albrecht Dürer Watercolor pencils (used dry). Click on the image to view an enlargement.

On Sept. 6 I wrote about taking a mental break when your energy is low by returning to a favorite drawing standby. I thought you would enjoy seeing another example of this from my 2009 Minnesota State Fair visits. At the Sketch Out on Sept. 1 I returned to the barns after a short Corn Dog break and decided I really wanted to see some rich black lines on the paper. (It’s all that white paper, it’s blinding!) I sketched the above ewe with the Pentel Pocket Brush Pen and then scribbled in some various blues for shading. I really like the shapes I was able to catch quickly. It freed my mind up from the small strokes I had been taking all day with pencils.

Zapped back by this little break, I walked into the Poultry section with a renewed mission to sketch one more bird before I called it quits for the day (which had been a long day—I'd walked in at 10:38 a.m.).

6a01053560de5d970b0120a55ddc3e970b-450wi

Using Watersoluble Colored Pencils for Quick Backgrounds

090901DCow

Above: my last morning sketch from the Sketch Out—made just before our first group meeting. Faber-Castell Albrecht Dürer Watercolor Pencils used dry and wet on a 9 x 7 inch card of Fabriano Artistico 300 lb. HP Watercolor paper. Notes written with a Staedtler Pigment Liner 0.3. Click on the image to view an enlargement.

One great advantage of watersoluble colored pencils over wax-based colored pencils is the way you can use the first to create watercolor washes throughout your drawing. You can dissolve the lines of your sketch and blend colors together as you would with watercolor paint. Or you can leave your lines only partially dissolved for additional texture to your sketch/painting. Or you can simply leave them dry, as originally applied, with the same sort of visual effect you would get using wax-based pencils.

If you have a large area to cover and no time you can also lay in a background of blended color much more quickly with these pencils than with wax-based ones.

In this post I have three examples all made on the Sketch Out trip to this year’s State Fair. For each sketch I simply drew the animal I was observing. Then I scribbled in a background of colored lines, typically using two or three analogous colors in a random order across the background (placing darker colors where I wanted more contrast, but no more thought than that to the placement).

6a01053560de5d970b0120a553bb5a970b-450wi

Sketching with Colored Pencils: Why Blue?

090901CPig

Above: Pig sketch from my second trip to the 2009 Minnesota State fair. (Yes there is a faint outline of his shadow on the wall. I didn't know if I would have time to paint in the background or not; but this shadow isn't to be confused with the restated tail—it had to be moved up higher on the butt to give roundness to the ham.) Faber-Castell
Albrecht Dürer Watercolor Pencils used dry on a 9 x 7 inch card of
Fabriano Artistico 300 lb. HP Watercolor paper. Notes written with a
Staedtler Pigment Liner 0.3. Click on the image to view an enlargement.

After warming up on with some gesture sketches of pigs (see yesterday's post) I had a very pleasant talk with the owner of this pig. We talked about her husband's love of pig breeding and showing. She laughed saying, "There are worse things—race cars, dangerous things…I only wish my husband had a laundry at the farm so he wouldn't bring those clothes home."  (From that we can assume that they have a hobby farm.)

But I digress, blue pencils, why am I sketching with a blue pencil? Well I don't like to use black colored pencils at all (either wax or watersoluble). And I love Indanthrene Blue (which is the color of the pencil used above—remember PB60?) It seems a natural choice for me. When working with wax based pencils I can use it to create a grisaille; when working with watersoluble colored pencils I can use it to quickly blend shadow areas depending on the color choice I layer with it. Bottom line I just like the way it looks on the paper. I prefer it to a warm or cool gray. If I add other colors on top of it I get blending possibilities the grays don't offer me.

6a01053560de5d970b0120a54fdd97970b-450wi

Last Chance to Visit the 2009 Minnesota State Fair

Above: My first journal card from my second visit to the 2009 Minnesota State Fair on September 1, 2009. Faber-Castell Albrecht Dürer Watercolor Pencils used dry on a 9 x 7 inch card of Fabriano Artistico 300 lb. HP Watercolor paper. Notes written with a Staedtler Pigment Liner 0.3. I started in the top left […]

6a01053560de5d970b0120a58f191e970c-250wi

Draw What Interests You: Sketching at the Minnesota State Fair

090828DSheep

Above: My fourth journal card from my first visit to the 2009 Minnesota State Fair. Here I caught a black-faced ewe sitting in a protective canvas jacket with a large green collar. (Faber-Castell Albrecht Dürer Watercolor Pencils used dry on a 9 x 7 inch card of Fabriano Artistico 300 lb. hot press watercolor paper. Notes were written with a 0.3 Staedtler Pigment Liner.) Click on the image to view an enlargement.

The eye and aspect of this ewe, sitting in her protective coat with its high green collar attracted my attention. First she was sitting still and "promised" to do so for a few minutes more. Second there was something lovely about her eye. Third there was the delightful shading of black on black across her face. And then there was the crispness of the collar against her shorn beige neck.

The First Minnesota State Fair Sketch Out

Above: A video of the first Minnesota State Fair Sketch Out made by Ken Avidor. Read below for more information and if the embedded video doesn't work go to You Tube. Tuesday, September 1 was discount day at the Fair ($9) and the inaugural Minnesota State Fair Sketch Out. Sure a lot of us sketch […]

6a01053560de5d970b0120a58ee98c970c-450wi

Flexible Intent: Sketching at the State Fair

090828BGoats

Above: Second journal card from my first visit to the 2009 Minnesota State Fair. The card is 9 x 7 inches and is 300 lb. hot press Fabriano Artistico watercolor paper. I used Faber-Castell Albrecht Dürer Watercolor Pencils dry. I started sketching the top left drawing of a goat pilfering food from the next pen and then noticed the lovely goat two pens down. Click on the image to view an enlargement.

I've written before in my "Journal Superstitions" series about using the whole page (or in this case card) and not worrying about being perfect. I've also written about composition. I find that sketching animals provides immediate reminders of the need to keep moving and to simply get something down on paper. I wanted to post this card to encourage you to really push at the Fair, and keep sketching whatever is in front of your eyes that appeals to you. Don't worry about composition, just get something down on the page.

6a01053560de5d970b0120a5681193970c-250wi

Paper Choices: Strathmore Illustration Board for Wet Media

090820PigeonStrathIllBoardS Left: Pigeon test sketch on the new wet media illustration board from Strathmore. Approx 5 x 7 inches. Faber-Castell Albrecht Dürer Watercolor Pencils. This is a pigeon I met at last year's State Fair. I drew it using sketches made at that time for reference. Click on the image to view an enlargement.

The Minnesota State Fair starts today!
Go Sketch!

One of the fun side effects of getting yourself organized for the State Fair—and no I don't go on Opener (as I like to call it to the consternation of fisherman everywhere) because I like to let the food vendors get the kinks out before I show up—is that you have the perfect excuse for trying out new paper. (OK, I don't really need much of an excuse. It just has to be a paper that might prove useful to me.)

Strathmore creates some excellent papers that literally make my work possible. I love their 500 Series plate Bristol for pen and ink work (2-ply) and for painting (5-ply). Many of their drawing papers are suitable for binding into journals used by visual artists. Their 500 Series is their top of the line paper. Now they have an addition to this series: Illustration Board for Wet Media.

6a01053560de5d970b0120a5110a56970b-450wi

Minnesota State Fair Prep—#11: Paper Selection

090820ATurkey

Above: 9 x 7 inch trial journal card made of 300 lb. Fabriano Artistico Extra White hot press watercolor paper. Wild Turkey sketch using Faber-Castell Albrecht Dürer Watercolor Pencils. Click on the image to view an enlargement.

It’s time to make decisions—get paper and other media ready for sketching at the Minnesota State Fair. Yes I've been writing about this since August 12, but I still have some decisions of my own to make.

At the end of last week I was still thinking about what paper I wanted to work on. Since I had already purchased several sheets of 300 lb. hot press Fabriano Artistico I was hoping I liked it as much for the Faber-Castell Albrecht Dürer Watercolor Pencils I had decided to use, as I do for ink sketches (which I typically do at the Fair).

RozWoundUp
Close Cookmode

Pin It on Pinterest