Currently Browsing: Hahnemühle Sketchbooks

Platinum Carbon Black ink fountain pen sketch with watercolor washes. This page was taped off with Nichiban masking tape. The tape removed cleanly. As mentioned in the text the paper buckles from the watercolor application—this is clearly see at the top of the scan where the page is wavy even when placed weighted on the scanner. I made this sketch later in my use of the book and am starting to grow accustom to water usage on the paper. The cold press texture of the paper allows interesting puddles of paint when using sedimentary colors like Azure blue. Mixing colors on the page is possible because of the quality of the sizing and the flow it promotes. (I was testing a palettes of new colors for this sketch.)

Hahnemühle Watercolor Sketchbook Review: Part 1

Today I’m going to begin a three part review of the Hahnemühle Watercolor Sketchbook. I suggest that you read all three parts before purchasing. I will write more about this in a moment. This sketchbook was released in 2017. I purchased two in the summer of 2017 but was unable to work in them until […]

Here's a closer look at those dirty washes.

In Context: Dirty Brushes

In general I like to start a work session with clean brushes. Which means you want to end a session by cleaning your brushes. Sometimes when I’m sketching out and about there isn’t enough water in my water brush to flush out the bristles. I find that I would rather paint something than worry too […]

Here is a detail of the sketch showing a bit of lifting around the nose.

A Couple More Thoughts on Green and Flat Brushes

I wanted to show another green-based watercolor I worked on last year while I was testing the Hahnemühle Watercolor Sketchbook. (A review with lots of details about that paper and the binding of that sketchbook will appear in a couple weeks.)  Today’s image was created mostly with watercolor flats. I went in with round brushes […]

My sketch of Dick when I was in the emergency. I can see by the line that it is less fluid than normal, stopping almost artificially and turning at various points in a way I don't usually do. Additional there are restatements that I've obviously zoned out in—making more and more marks in one area instead of balancing marks across the surface. And there are several places where I can see and remember I made marks even though I was telling myself, "Don't." I just couldn't hear myself through the pain.

Why Drawing Practice Matters and What Your Line Can Tell You

Readers of my blog know that I love observing my process. I can’t help myself. Even during emergencies. I think you can learn a lot about yourself and find ways to always sketch. On November 19 I fell in a friend’s foyer. I was rushing across the foyer to my fanny pack to change my […]

A full spread sketch in the largest Hahnemühle Nostalgie sketchbook. I used a Bienfang Magenta watercolor brush pend to start and did the comb and wattles and area around the eye. A little different approach for me because I usually start with the eye. Then I decided to paint some of the features, add color to the background, and also add some stenciling detail to the background.

When Do You Stop? When Is A Drawing Finished

I think the number one question I get from students is: “When do I know my drawing is finished?” Most people aren’t going to like the answer. You’ll know after you’ve taken a ton of sketches past the point of no return. Here’s the thing, you’re asking a question that involves choices both stylistic choices […]

I believe in the value of making a mess. I believe that sometimes you just need to make marks on a page, just to get things down on a page and to keep the flow going.

In-Context—Doodling

 

On a recent trip to the dentist I used my time in the waiting room to sketch a couple people. I was just warming up when I found myself alone, but then I was called too. I really like the top right sketch. I was able to get just the essential details to capture her face.

Waiting at the Dentist’s

I think it’s easy to always have a small pocket sketchbook with you so that you can make quick sketches of the people around you. When you’re somewhere it’s going to be impossible to get finished sketched (because either you or the model is going to leave quickly) find something you can focus on.  I […]

This quick brush pen sketch with an acrylic marker background allowed me to assess a new type of illustration board in under 5 minutes. (6 x 9 inches)

Two Reasons to Work in a Series

Background Information You Should Know Yes, I have a collection of plastic dinosaurs. They are scale replicas. Yes they are technically toys but did I mention they are scale replicas. If you’ve taken any drawing class from me you’ll have heard me talk about these subjects—still life subjects who are great stand ins for live […]

Achilles’ Heel, Everyone’s Got One

My Achilles’ Heel, used to be the girls, and how quickly I could get them out of their crates (and with what tools) if there was an accident in the Bronco. Now it’s clear that my Achilles’ Heel is Dick’s eyes. Dick had cataract surgery almost a month ago. What should have been a quick […]

Quick sketches of some Bosc Pears with a Pentel dye-based brush pen. A Niji water brush was used to draw out the shading from the water-soluble ink lines. (All in the largest portrait Hahnemühle Nostalgie Sketchbook—the paper is a dream to work on with the PPBP and its cousins.)

What Do You Have on Hand?

It has been hectic here lately. I notice I’ve been getting grumpy. It’s not because I’m busy. I love being busy. It’s because I miss the Pentel Pocket Brush Pen (and the Pentel Colorbrush Pen cousins). All my projects involve other media right now. They leave little time in the day for my tired eyes to […]

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