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Fun on a Textured Background—OK Maybe I Over Did It

January 6, 2016
 

Usually I work in my journals chronologically. If I texture and put color on a page I work on it when I get to that page, just in the course of events. But sometimes, like when you’re at a meeting, working on a texture to write notes is a bit difficult, so I skip a pre-painted spread and work on the next page.

In the image at the left see the Pentel pigment brush pen and gouache sketch of Dick sitting in the TV room. (See shirt label at base for the only remaining ink line in the sketch. Other darks are blended neutrals in paint.) Another spread from my end-of-year Nideggen 7-1/2 inch journal. This sketch was made with brush pen and Schmincke Gouache from life working with a very patient model (5 minutes to sketch and 25 minutes to paint). I had thought to only work up the eyes and leave the rest of the texture that that had been prepainted on this page, visible. But I started without a clear plan in my head and then just used up the paint I had on the palette. I did build up some contrast with a mixed dark neutral, but I avoided adding any contrast in the shadows of the shirt. I didn’t want the eye to go there. Yes there is green in his hair. (Green, purple, orange are a triad. But Dick is a blond swimmer who doesn’t put product in his hair. Tell me you can’t see the green?) At the bottom of the post you’ll see the prepainted page.Usually I work in my journals chronologically. If I texture and put color on a page I work on it when I get to that page, just in the course of events. But sometimes, like when you’re at a meeting, working on a texture to write notes is a bit difficult, so I skip a pre-painted spread and work on the next page.

See the detail image A, below to see how I was applying paint quickly with the filbert.

By the time I finish a journal this typically means that I have one or two page spreads in the journal that have textured backgrounds but no sketch or journaling. I go back in and use up those pages.

I’m always ruthless about those pages. If the texture is great I work all over it anyway, and as you can see here I even obliterate it. It’s too bad. I had a lovely English Red color gently migrating across the spread. I would have been able to read those meeting notes! Now the only place you see it is at the forehead and base of the sketch.

See the five minute brush pen sketch B, below, that I used as the basis of this painting. Click on the image to view the enlargement. (It’s a little off in color because I took a photo of the book lying on the floor in dim light.)

But what fun to paint with gouache on this paper. I couldn’t stop. 

The new year will be full of fun textures to paint on. Some of them will remain “secret.”

A. Detail of the gouache sketch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

B. Brush Pen Sketch.

 

 

 

 

 

The prepainted page (acrylic), before I did the pen and gouache sketch. Click on the image to view an enlargement and when you do you can also see the lovely fiber flecks in this paper. 

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    • Mary
    • January 6, 2016
    Reply

    I loved this sketch. I made a note to remember to paint a page first and then draw. I seem to forget that process and I love it. Thanks for sharing. Mary

    • Alison A
    • January 6, 2016
    Reply

    Love this… it’s quite Hulk-esque!

  1. Reply

    Thanks Alison, glad you see the green.

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