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Links of Possible Interest: Supplies at Wet Paint and a Gigapan of the 30 Birds in 30 Days Show

January 28, 2010

A Gigapan view of 30 Birds in 30 Days and a link to my art materials recommendations at Wet Paint

The other day my friend, photographer Tom Nelson, took a Gigapan of my bird painting show, and while I've posted a photo of the salon on my blog, the Gigapan allows you to zoom in and see details. The only downside is that if people move before the panning process is finished in their area, we only get partial people—but you're not looking at it for that anyway right? I didn't want to ask one stylist to stand aside for a couple minutes (I hate being interrupted in my work and don't like to do it to others) so there is one rooster image you will not see in the panoramic view, but you can see it in my photo.

Also visible on the Gigapan is my sign showing one of the necklaces I made. A couple readers have asked about this. If you go to the Gigapan link and look at the "snapshots" along the base of the image you'll see one for the necklace. Click on it and the image will scan right to it and you can scroll around to see the rest of the necklace and read the poster. (Note: you do not have to be a member of Gigapan to scroll its images. If you want to create snapshots you do need to create a free account.)

Next, Tim Jennen at Wet Paint has compiled a "recommendations" page from me and one of their cartoonist clients. Both of us have listed products we highly recommend. In my case, these will are products I have reviewed here in a post, or have mentioned in several posts because I use the item all the time. For instance, people interested in the Japanese nibs I use for dip pen work will find them here without having to worry about Japanese package labels.

I'll make a link in "Pages" or find some other way to put this link in the left-hand column of my blog, so that later visitors can find this information, but in the meantime I wanted to let daily readers know the recommendations page was up.

I do not receive any payment from Wet Paint if you purchase anything from them. I'm doing this as a way to provide quick links to the items I talk about. Also I do most of my shopping for art supplies at Wet Paint so it is logical that I refer to them. And finally, I think Wet Paint is the best art supply store in the world so I know that if people purchase from them I don't have to lose any sleep over it. You can find my art materials recommendations here.

If you end up wanting to return to the recommendations page and haven't bookmarked it, simply go to the Wet Paint home page and look in the left-hand column for "Bloggers' Picks." That will take you to the recommendations page.

  1. Reply

    I love the gigapan image(s), they are amazing and clear! The show looks great, even if headless, hairy people visit it! 🙂

    • Roz
    • January 28, 2010
    Reply

    Thanks Melanie, it’s good fun to see all the little details the Gigapan captures, I’m glad you enjoy it. I love the ceiling and the big pipes in this space!

    Take a peek at other Gigapans Tom has done. (He’s even done some of my studio.) They are great fun for finding little details that we sometimes overlook in spaces.

    • Alex
    • January 28, 2010
    Reply

    Loved this gigapan! It’s almost like being there.

    Thank you for posting a link to your supply list. The variety of materials available today is mind boggling for a newbie artist. Which pen to choose? Which inks? Which paints? Your list gives a great starting point because along with your blog I see the results you can achieve with these supplies and make a more-or-less informed decision.

    • Debbie L
    • January 28, 2010
    Reply

    Hi Roz,

    I will have to look at the gigapan at home as my work computer wont let me. I really like the bird painting that I saw on an earlier post.

    I have a bookbinding question, if you dont mind. I make very simple art journals constructed with signatures sewn to bookbnding tape (between covers). Inside the book, theres always a gap between the signatures which I dont really like. Is there a way to prevent this?

    BTW, I wrote you a couple of weeks about drawing. I have been drawing for a minimum of 15 minutes everyday (usually longer cause I get into it) for 14 days. I repeat the mantra “its never too late to draw” because I often find time at the end of my day. I have another 14-16 days to make sure this becomes a habit, but I am actually enjoying myself (surprise!). Thank you,

    Debbie

    • Roz
    • January 28, 2010
    Reply

    Thank you Alex, I will let Tom know.

    As for the supplies, I know it’s a lot to think about. So I always tell people to start simply with one or two items and really work them every day for a month or so before they branch out to something else. With luck you might find the best thing first! At worst, you’ve got some solid time really learning how to use a particular tool.

    Good luck with your selections.

    • Roz
    • January 28, 2010
    Reply

    Debbie, first, congratulations on drawing daily for two weeks. Keep it up!! That’s fantastic.

    As for the bookbinding question, I’m not exactly sure what you mean about sewing sigs to bookbinding tape between covers—I’m guessing it’s what we call sewing on tapes in a case binding.

    If that is the case (no pun intended) then the thing you want to do is glue up your spine and back it with mull.

    Aldren A Watson, whose book is on my list of recommended binding books, has instructions for binding a multi-sig book on tapes. Pages 44 through 47 cover this (gluing up the back) with GREAT illustrations. You’ll need to knock the book up so it’s square, put it in press (Aldren explains the different presses used, these are not printing presses) or put it under weights with the spine exposed, glue up the spine, and apply mull. It’s a little bit more involved, but like I said, he has wonderful illustrations.

    The mull extends like wings on each side of the spine and will be pasted down when you paste your endsheets down, making them and their attachment stronger too, so it’s a win-win situation. (Ideally you would want to tip in the mull on the first and second signatures over the signature’s fold, so the mull gets sewn into the book for best strength, but that’s a bit more complicated to explain, and I don’t know a book that shows that.)

    Pauline Johnson, whose book is also on my list (see under “Categories” for “Essential Bookshelf for Bookbinders”) covers the same process of gluing up the back that Aldren uses with photos!

    Hope this helps.

    Keep drawing!

    • Debbue L
    • January 28, 2010
    Reply

    Thanks Roz! I dont have either of those books in my personal library, but I will look for them.

    I am off to draw. 😀

    • Debbue L
    • January 28, 2010
    Reply

    PS I LOVE your show! The gigaspan was really fun.

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