share

Nothing Is in Order in My Life, Why Should This Be Different?

October 22, 2009

A video peek in a visual journal in process.

This embedded video is a quick peek through the Weirdo Journal I'm working in right now. I was actually going to write about the journal and its many weirdo aspects before posting the video, but hey I seem to have slipped the chronological ties that normally govern me, so what the heck…

If the embedded video doesn't work you can view it on YouTube.

  1. Reply

    That was great Roz…and love hearing your voice…now I can hear you “talk” when I read your blog…cool beans!

  2. Reply

    I really like your journals and the way you approach them. It’d be nice to see some of your paintings that you’ve been working on lately.

    • Christina Trevino.
    • October 22, 2009
    Reply

    Now that I started painting and collaging backgrounds on a couple of journals, you post this Weirdo Journal that shows more of your techniques. Now I feel that my attempts are validated.
    I am using gesso on some pages. Do you use it?

    • Roz
    • October 22, 2009
    Reply

    Roberta, if you want to hear me talking more you can do so at http://officialinternationalfakejournalblog.blogspot.com/2009/05/paging-through-rozs-2009-fake-journal.html

    were I page through and talk about my 2009 Fake Journal.

    Or you can quit while you’re ahead!

    • Roz
    • October 22, 2009
    Reply

    Jon, thanks for asking about that. Mostly what I’ve been painting is rock portraits. It’s an on-going series of rock paintings in gouache. They tend to not look very interesting on the computer screen as the issue of scale is removed, and that’s what makes them cool (I think) in life. That and the detail I put in.

    But I will be posting some bird, dog, and other types of paintings. I just get wrapped up in the journal.

    • Roz
    • October 22, 2009
    Reply

    Christina, I don’t use much gesso in my journals, but I do use it when I’m painting, either to prepare paper or canvas or in the process.

    Upon occasion when I do use gesso in my journal it’s typically because I’m using acrylic paints, and I don’t do that a lot inside my journals because I don’t like the sticky page syndrome that seems to result.

    I will use absorbent ground, which is sort of like gesso in that it prepares surfaces, in this case for watermedia.

    And in other instances I’ll use gesso in a light layer to cover a spread and “fix” a drawing (keep it from smudging and create a sort of light film over it).

    I don’t use it to cover things in my journal.

    • Carol C.
    • October 22, 2009
    Reply

    I really enjoyed that video….made your journals come alive for me in a way that just reading about them hadn’t. Can you tell me again the name of the paper you used? Between your Italian pronunciation and my ears that were raised in Texas I mostly missed it. Thanks, Carol C.

    • elizabeth
    • October 22, 2009
    Reply

    Roz,

    I am only into minute 2 of this video and I had to stop and wipe up the huge puddle of drool….!! I am SMITTEN by this journal! And I just had to let you know.

  3. Reply

    I love it when you make videos Roz. One of my favorites was your fake journal 2009, which was so cool, especially with the paper noise.

  4. Reply

    Roz, I LOVE when you do these videos of your journals – seriously you need to do more of these! It’s such a different experience from just looking at the pages separately from photos. I loved your Fake journal video and have been waiting for more! Ok, so I do have a couple of questions I’ve been wanting to ask you. What product do you use to apply piece of paper to your journals? Do you use decoupage glue? I’m most interested in the pieces you are putting down and then later will be painting over – does that loosen the glue up when you start to moisten it again with paint? Do you have any posts about your writing – like how you lay it out before you start “journaling”? I love how everything is “blocked” out – do you draw a block first with pencil and then lightly put in your lines and then erase all that after you write in it? I appreciate that you always answer questions and respond – you’re a great blogger Roz!

  5. Reply

    Loved the “Fake Journal Video” Roz…I’ve seen your journal…in fact that is how I found your blog…but somehow missed the video. I also like the field guide and how the paper sounds when you flip through the journal. I’m off to do more wedding stuff…my niece gets married this Sunday…and can’t wait to get back to my journals. Have a great weekend, fondly, Roberta

    • Roz
    • October 23, 2009
    Reply

    Carol, check out today’s post (Friday, Oct. 23, 2009) for the proper spelling of the paper’s name, and a link to more info about it. Also check past posts from this journal, as this seems to be the ONLY post on this journal in which I omitted the paper name! Sorry.

    • Roz
    • October 23, 2009
    Reply

    elizabeth, you’re funny. I hope you like it when it’s all filled up! Thanks.

    • Roz
    • October 23, 2009
    Reply

    Thanks Donna, I still take that journal down every so often and rustle the pages. Yummy! It makes me smile. (I’m easily amused.)

    • Roz
    • October 23, 2009
    Reply

    Sandi. I want to do move videos, but I have to get a digital video camera. My little camera is just too silly for this!

    Good questions. I could do a post on them, and maybe I will! But in the meantime:

    1. gluing things: I always use UHU gluestick PURPLE variety because it doesn’t smell and it works for me on just about everything. On glossy paper stock I’ll rough up the back with an X-Acto blade held perpendicular to the paper, just so the glue can have texture to adhere to but I generally have no problems.

    I don’t like decoupage glue for anything. I don’t like gel mediums and such because I always end up with some sticky pages—but a woman at the collective on Monday uses only Matte Medium and I touched her pages and they weren’t sticky, so that’s a possibility if you want to try it.

    2. Does later painting loosen the glue? Yep it can do if I use a lot of water. I tend to keep my water at a minimum. But Uhu can pick up if the page gets wet enough, or even if the next page (backside) gets wet! I just put a bit of glue on a flat piece of paper and slide it into the gap when the paper is dry, and then press it down (after removing the scrap with glue). Or if it is peeling back, I reglue it and then press it down. Sometimes I just leave it bucking a bit if for some reason it isn’t enough to bother me.

    3. I typically don’t layout my writing in anyway before I write on the page. I simply make my drawing and then pick an area I want to write in and start writing. I tend to write in columns because I’m a neat and tidy kind of gal. I also spent the early part of my professional life laying out magazines so my brain thinks in columns. I am always running out of room, so my visual journal isn’t as interesting as what I might have written if I’d had more room, planned better, or done a rough draft—but hey then it wouldn’t be journaling.

    I have one exception to the just writing. I do have some column templates (cardboard) that I made in 2000 when I wanted to be very neat, but then quickly abandoned them. I did save them however, and sometimes if I’m really going nutty in a journal I will use these on the last page before the page I’m saving for the index, and create two columns marked with pencil lines in which to write NOTES about the media used on different pages etc. I don’t know why I do this only there. I think it might be my way to impose order in a journal that has run amok. I also think they serve as a placeholder for those notes.

    But in the normal course of events on any given page I pretty much have to just jump in and write. Oh, I just thought of one other exception. If I am going to a meeting, I will mark column lines on a couple pages in pencil, so that my notes will take up as little space as possible. I want to get them in my journal, but I don’t want then to take over everything and if I have columns marked then they stay contained.

    But even when I don’t mark columns before a meeting I’ll still write in columns for the same reason, to keep things contained.

    The main reason I just write is because I don’t want to mess with another step of something, in this case erasing. And also I’m not that concerned that it all be neat and tidy—that can get in the way of just journaling. But to everything there are exceptions. Never say Never, etc.

    • Roz
    • October 23, 2009
    Reply

    Roberta, hope you family’s wedding celebration comes off well. Take your journal with you!

  6. Reply

    Roz, thanks for sharing all this – it was helpful. You are always so generous with the info. you share. I understand about the videos – I’m sure that’s a pain in the behind to deal with that. However, on this end it doesn’t bother those of us watching it at all – I could only tell that’s what was going on when you mentioned something about it – other than that we get lost in the journal!

    • elizabeth
    • October 29, 2009
    Reply

    Roz,

    I forgot to ask you about the graph paper that you use. The graph doesn’t show up in the video, but I would assume it is visible on the page? What paper do you use?

    Thx.

    • Roz
    • October 29, 2009
    Reply

    elizabeth, I’m actually going to post a couple stills of the graph paper spreads just so people can see things more clearly. (It will happen sometime in the next several days.) But yes, the graph lines do show and I think that looks really fun. So you don’t have to wait: I use the 8 x 8 grid Quatro pads from Handbook which have acid free paper AND are very slick so the brush pen just dances on the page.

    • elizabeth
    • October 29, 2009
    Reply

    Ahh…maybe my issues isn’t so much with the brush pen, but my paper! There isn’t much dancing going on when I use it — just a couple of stumbles and an all out sprawl. 🙂

    • Roz
    • October 29, 2009
    Reply

    elizabeth, if you find the brush isn’t moving smoothly for you on your paper it may be a really toothy paper and while that can look cool with a brush pen (because the tooth will break up the line of the brush pen) it might not be what you need at the moment. Get some smoother paper which allows the brush tip to glide and then practice varying the pressure you put on the tip. Sometimes you bear down and the line is thick, other times you dance right up on the tip of the brush and the thin line you get is magical.

    Of course it helps that Pentel Pocket Brush Pens have such resilient brush tips!

    In watercolor brushes the same fun can be had with the Isabey Squirrel Mop!

    Happy experiments!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

RozWoundUp
Close Cookmode

Pin It on Pinterest